Koru Fundamentals Asia

Upcoming Courses

  • Jun 2 - Jun 30 (AM) - 06/02/2021 - 06/30/2021 - 10:00 am (+08) - 11:30 am (+08)

    Meeting Dates: Jun 2, Jun 9, Jun 16, Jun 23, Jun 30

    This course will be taught in English.

  • Jun 2 - Jun 30 (PM) - 06/02/2021 - 06/30/2021 - 7:30 pm (+08) - 9:00 pm (+08)

    Meeting Dates: Jun 2, Jun 9, Jun 16, Jun 23, Jun 30

    This course will be taught in English.

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No Comments to "Koru Fundamentals Asia"
Holly

Hi Everybody, We have transitioned to feedback and discussion about our course, Teaching Mindfulness to Emerging Adults. Thanks for your emails. If you are feeling social, leave your comments here and we can have a group discussion. I look forward to hearing from you.

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Robyn Kenney

Hi Holly and Koru Mindfulness,

I completely agree that being able to tell a compelling story is a great way to pull people in and see the value in mindfulness. I coach athletes and they were skeptical at first as well, but once they heard my story and the head coaches’ story about how guided visualization and mindfulness practice helped us perform better on the field they tried it and saw the benefits on the field and in the classroom! These blog posts are great confirmation about what works.

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Holly Rogers

Hi Robyn, Athletes in particular have a lot to gain from mindfulness. I find our collegiate athletes are often very disciplined individuals, having worked so hard to develop their athletic abilities. They are usually willing to put in the time to learn mindfulness once they see how it can be helpful, and a good story about other athletes often does the trick. I love George Mumford’s book The Mindful Athlete. Check it out if you have’t read it yet.

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lee guerette

yup that my audience — I also add in EQ and Study Skills… When you think about it.. slowing down, thinking deeply, nonjudgemental observation… are executive functions.

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Miriam Ojaghi

Hello Everyone,
I am planning to attend training this summer and then deliver Koru in the fall as part of my dissertation work. Our campus tends to have the noon hour free for meetings and lunch. One idea I had, after hearing students talk about trying to get lunch between classes was to offer food at the beginning of training. Given their time constraints and our biological need for sustenance I thought this might be one way to ensure better attendance. Communing around food is also a cultural practice that might help build the sense of community referenced above. I look forward to hearing your thoughts.

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Holly Rogers

Hey Miriam. I’ll be curious to hear what others have to say about this as well. In Koru, the curriculum moves quickly as a way of keeping the students engaged and managing a relatively brief time frame. We haven’t found that it works for them to eat in class. At the same time, I’m a huge fan of not missing lunch and feeding students often is a great draw, so you may have to be a bit creative and see what works. Other thoughts? Holly

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Miriam Ojaghi

Hi Holly, my thought was I would just allot 10 minutes before we start and have some healthy offerings like fruit, veggies and some pretzels or something. I might actually ask the students for ideas for quick and easy food they like. We shall see!

Allison Roest

In my work with students, I think I see time as more of a barrier than skepticism. I am often really happy to find that our students are both aware and interested in mindfulness. The word seems to be getting out!
In terms of addressing the issue of time, one of the things I love best about mindfulness practices are the wide variety of options. Student love hearing that they can practice mindfulness without changing their schedules around much at all. It is my experience that starting with informal practices, like walking, and very short mindfulness meditation practices (5 min) allow students to get a taste for mindfulness without a big commitment at first. Then once the students get a chance to see what mindfulness actually entails and experience some small benefits, even with little effort, they are much more open to making space in their lives for longer, more focused work.
Thanks for starting this forum Holly and Libby.
I am looking forward to your next posts!

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Holly Rogers

Hey Allison. I couldn’t agree more about inviting students to start with small periods of practice, and then building on the motivation that is produced when they start to see benefit. It’s amazing how much young adults benefit from even small amounts of practice. Must be those wonderfully youthful, flexible nervous systems! And the word is getting out, indeed. I find the resistance to the idea of mindfulness and meditation has been steadily declining over the last decade, which is great news, indeed! Take care, Holly

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pamela willsey

HI Holly and Libby,
As a therapist and life coach for girls who are in high school and college, I am thrilled to have found this community! I am hoping to add a mindfulness group for high school girls this year and have been trained by Gina Biegel of Stressed Teens in her virtual course on MBSR-T. I would love to be able to find a way to learn more about your methods, as I cannot attend your training this summer. Adding a virtual course to your offering would be so helpful 🙂
Warmly,
Pam Willsey

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Holly Rogers

Hi Pam. Nice to hear from you. We will be offering an online course soon just for folks like you. So keep your eyes open! We have worked mainly with college-age adults, but we have quite a few Koru teachers now working in high schools and they are reporting great results, which is encouraging. I have heard good things about Gina’s MBSR-T course as well. Take care, Holly

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Sara

Hi Holly, I am considering taking your course this summer. But I have a couple of questions. I have practiced MBSR and then workshops and retreats for six years. I have taught at the community college level, mainly ESL students. I would like to know if your training would be viable for this population. Thanks.

Libby Webb

Hey Pam,
As Holly noted, we will be offering an online course very soon. It is great to hear from you. We have found a number of our Koru high school teachers are really enjoying teaching mindfulness to this age group. Perhaps we will meet you during an online course! Libby

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pamela willsey

Hey Libby and Holly,
I am about to embark on teaching my very first MBSR-T course for high school students this Fall and am still very interested in any online courses that you develop. Just used your guided meditations link for a virtual support community called the Real Deal Girls Project that I developed for high school and college girls. Check it our on facebook by “liking” real deal girls project.

Lucy Shimidzu

Hi Holly and everyone at KORU
Your findings are the same as I find in practice; moreover many students who initially find mindfulness practices beneficial in many ways; (responses in order of frequency after short introductory courses, typically 4 weeks of 1-2 hour sessions; relaxing/destressing, enlivening sensory perception, increasing attention to present activity, feeling more attuned to emotions, increased empathy), I think that establishing regular practice for most people requires participation in a community of practice, e.g. ongoing group meetings of some kind, often difficult to establish in our busy lives.
Best wishes to all in continuing the good work!
Lucy

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Libby Webb

Hi Lucy,
So nice to hear about your experience with this age group. I have found so much of the benefit of teaching emerging adults is doing it in a group setting. At Koru we teach in small groups and the students/young adults get so much traction from practicing as a group. It really helps them commit. So thanks and best wishes in your continued practice.

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Libby Webb

We are so excited to hear your thoughts about Holly’s teaching insights. Please let us know about your experiences teaching mindfulness to young adults!
Libby Webb
Co-Founder
The Center for Koru Mindfulness

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Holly Rogers

Hi all! I’m so excited to see there are so many people on this page right now. I’ve been looking forward to getting this post up and running and look forward to hear you observations.

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